Life, Writing

Eventually.

I don’t have a smartphone.

I don’t have an iPhone either.

I have a simple flip phone and every couple of months I have to put money on it for it to be active. Oftentimes I forget and have to call the company to re-activate the phone before adding the money.

People are shocked when they learn this. They can’t comprehend that there’s a human in the world that doesn’t have a cell phone that has the world at the fingertips.

I don’t mind. Not really. I don’t need the world at my fingertips. I only have a cell phone in case of an emergency. My mom and a couple of close friends know my number just in case something goes wrong and I need them.

I’m sure that most people in the world has that one piece of technology that they refuse to take part in and the cell phone’s mine. If you want to talk to me, call me on my landline. Or can you can message me through my social media and I will get to either eventually. You don’t need me at my fingertips. You don’t need to be a hold of me for every second of the day. Unless a family member or myself is dying or seriously ill, then whatever you have to say isn’t that important.

It will reach me eventually.

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Writing

On Bullet Journals and Blogs.

Bullet journals.

You’ve probably heard of them. I certainly have; they’ve been all the rage in the last couple of years.

Surprisingly, I didn’t get swept away in this latest fad. Or maybe it’s not surprising. You just don’t know me yet. (Or do you?)

To be honest, I never thought too much of them, you know? It seemed like there was a lot of effort to put into it just to make your own DIY daily planner.

And that’s essentially what bullet journals are: daily planners. With colored markers and doodles and who knows what else. They’re so simple that I’m kind of confused by them all. I tried looking them up online to try and get a clear idea of what they’re supposed to be about.

But there’s no such thing. There’s a website that’s supposed to be the official website of bullet journals, but it tells me nothing. I don’t think I’ll ever fully understand it, to be completely honest.

The other day, I read a blog post on “How To Create a Bullet Journal for Blogs.” The one in the link is part two-part one can easily be found on her blog. I immediately read her posts because I thought it would be interesting and something that could finally make me understand the darn things and even finally have a reason to start one (because I blog, duh.)

I still don’t understand it. It seems simple enough but you have to plan out each month and create enough pages and months and the like. There’s just too many details coming into the pot all at once. This is supposed to help you get organized and make things simpler. It didn’t. It just made me more stressed out. If someone created a bullet journal and sold it in the store, I’d probably buy it, but to buy a blank journal and set the whole thing up myself? I don’t think so.

I did like the idea of writing down my blog post ideas. You guys don’t know how many times I’ve had a great idea but don’t jot it down and then when I’m finally ready to sit down and write, I can’t remember what I wanted to say. So, I might incorporate that into my blogging plans.

If you have a bullet journal, let me know how it works for you, what you’ve used it for and whether or not it’s helped you become a better person. Because minimalism, right? Or whatever the next hot fad is in these days.

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Writing

How You Engage Me.

Your eyes are too blue, your skin is too smooth

Your eyes could shine a little less, the Arizona

sun couldn’t shine so intensely.

The blonde hair is that of a Californian, perfectly

in place with the finesse of the athletically

obsessed. You’re so perfect, even to the attitude

that would shatter the glass you stand before

most mornings,

hoping the likes you get will number in the

hundreds, the comments thousands.

I post the happy things,

the mundane, the everyday. I post

these things and yet you don’t bat an eye.

The average things that people do,

you couldn’t even comment

and yet

the moment I post a stronger opinion,

or something bad that

happened,

you’re instantly commenting on what

you think is right and

not regarding what was actually said

or even if I wanted the feeling assuaged.

It seems as if you only care about the drama

And you think I’m

The shallow one.

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Facebook Unplugged.

I decided to delete Facebook.

It was something that I’ve been tossing over for a couple of years now. I’ve wanted to delete it because I’m just tired of it all. I was tired of the arguing, I was tired of the obnoxiousness of some people, I was tired of the silly little memes that people shared. I was just tired.

But I hesitated on deleting it.

I hesitated because there were a handful of people I truly cared about and seeing what they were posting about. I enjoyed seeing what they were doing in their daily lives. I wanted to delete everybody except these few people but I knew that there were a select few who would be offended by my deletion.

And even before I deleted Facebook, I deleted a few people, namely I hadn’t talked to them in a long time or hadn’t cared about what they posted anyway. A few others I deleted because they were obnoxious about their political posts and I couldn’t stand to read anymore of what they wrote. Sure, I took them out of my newsfeed so I wouldn’t have to look at them, but whenever I made a post that was vaguely politically, they would comment on it and be stupid about it, even offended. And it just got tiring after a while.

Now that I’ve deleted Facebook, it’s been a relief and it’s only been a day. I’m relieved that I don’t have to feel tension whenever I log in and wonder what I’m going to see today. It’s a relief to no longer have to see these things and sift through to the ones that I actually wanted to catch up with.

Maybe in a couple of months I’ll create a new profile, one that contains just the friends that I want to be connected with, but we’ll see. Right now I’m going to enjoy being without Facebook for a while.

I still have Twitter and I enjoy Twitter. Some people might have more intense feelings about it but right now it feels like what Facebook was before it blew up in popularity or whatever it is you want to call it. It’s simple and doesn’t require a whole lot from the user. I can follow the people I want to follow and make short, happy posts about whatever I want. It’s a shame that nobody uses it more, especially people in my circles. But whatever floats your boat, I guess.

I’m still struggling with the blogging bit, but I hope that I can slowly ease my way back into it. Maybe I just need to take it easy on myself and not set high expectations.

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Writing

My time to reflect and be thankful.

In the midst of wars, protests, deaths, and other heartaches, it’s easy to lose sight of all the good in this world and focus on everything that’s bad. Tomorrow we Americans celebrate Thanksgiving, a holiday created exclusively for reflecting on the good and being thankful for what we have. I’ve had my share of bad times and I’ve forgotten to take the time to stop and see what good things I do have in my arsenal of experiences.

This morning I’m thankful for:

A roof over my head.

A job that pays me for the hours I work on time.

Clothes that keep me covered and warm during these cold months.

Food to keep me nourished.

Being able to stay home for the holidays and not have to go out and fight for these rights.

Having an education.

Living the life that I’ve lived.

Having a car to drive.

Getting to choose who I fall in love with or date (if at all).

An iPod that plays the music I want to listen to.

Getting some time off this week to sleep in and relax.

Having the good friends that I do.

Having a computer so I can blog and connect with others through other social media.

Having good health.

Having the rights and freedoms that I have.

Being able to read.

Not having to fear for my life.

Being able to catch my first fish and have my first motorcycle ride this year.

Knowing how to care and love someone deeply who has a serious illness, even if we’re no longer together or talking.

Sleeping in and snuggling in a warm bed.

Life in general.

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